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Feast of the Assumption of Mary

Friday, Aug. 15

Friday, August 15 is the Feast of the  Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary into Heaven. The Church holds that, at the end of her earthly life, Our Lady’s body was assumed into Heaven before it could begin to decay. Universal celebration of the Feast can be traced back to about the 6th century. It is considered the most important of all Marian feasts because it commemorates Mary’s entrance into eternal life.

On November 1, 1950, Pope Pius XII declared “that the Immaculate Mother of God, the ever Virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory.” Exercising papal infallibility, Pope Pius XII declared this belief as a dogma of the Catholic Church.

Catholics are obliged to attend Mass on this day or on the vigil of this Feast. We will celebrate Mass in St. Catherine of Siena Chapel on Friday, Aug. 15 at 8AM and 7PM. We hope you can join us for this special feast honoring Mary, the Mother of God.

Did you know?

Baptism is the first formal sacrament that we receive in the Catholic Church. During this ritual, we welcome new members into our Church community using beautiful signs and symbols. Four important symbols that are used during baptism are water, light, a white garment, and oil.

Water cleanses and gives life. In baptism we “pass through water” a sign of our participation in the death of Christ and his emergence into freedom. We are cleansed and freed.

Jesus announces to us that he is “the light of the world.” At baptism, a small candle for each child is lit from the Paschal candle. The priest says, “Receive the light of Christ.”

At baptism the church wraps new members in a white garment–a sign of acceptance and belonging in the community of faith. The person being baptized is dressed in this garment during the rite of baptism–a visible sign of Jesus’ light and life now present in them.

Oil softens, heals, comforts, and protects. Oil has been used through the centuries as a sign of God’s favor. In the Old Testament, solemn anointing indicated those called for a specific task in God’ kingdom. Being baptized into the anointed body of Christ, we are called to be priest, by living a life of prayer; to be prophet, by announcing the Word of God; and to be king, by leading with integrity.

Channel change for CatholicTV

Beginning Labor Day, the daily Mass on CatholicTV will no longer be available on the ION, Channel 68. The Mass will continue to be broadcast on all cable systems in the Archdiocese: Comcast Ch. 268, Verizon Ch. FiOS Ch. 296, RCN Ch. 85 on Mondays through Fridays at 9:30 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.

And look for version 2.0 of their iOS app at CatholicTV.com!

A prayer for peace

In Iraq, minority religions face destruction.

Though we see it on the news and hear and read about it, the slaughter of Christians and others of different religions seems incomprehensible. But it is happening—today—and we are urged to learn about this story and join in prayer as a strong response to the suffering and evil of such persecutions of men, women, and children. Below you will read some of the facts and also hear the invitation from our Holy Father and Bishops to earnestly pray for a resolution to this horror.

Continue reading A prayer for peace

Did you know?

The sign of the cross is a hand motion many Christians make that signifies the Trinity and reflects their profession of faith in God. The most common expression of the sign begins with the hand touching the forehead and then the lower chest or stomach area, which signifies the vertical beam of the cross. The horizontal is signified by touching the left shoulder followed by the right.

Evidence of the sign of the cross exists in early Christianity. For example, in the late second century, Tertullian wrote, “In all our travels and movements, in all our coming in and going out, in putting on our shoes, at the bath, at the table, in lighting our candles, in lying down, in sitting down, whatever employment occupies us, we mark our foreheads with the sign of the cross.” And in the fourth century, Chrysostom encouraged Christians to “never leave home without making the sign of the cross.”

After the fourth century, the sign of the cross was a common gesture in Christianity. It is referenced in writings of Christian authors and visualized in Christian art.

Are you ready to make a difference?

St. Mary-St. Catherine of Siena Parish is looking for tutors for second-graders at the Harvard-Kent School. The time commitment is reasonable: one hour, one day a week, at lunchtime, 12:30 to 1:25p.m.

An initial meeting for those interested will be held at the Harvard-Kent School on Wednesday, September 10 at 5:00 p.m. Please bring a photo ID for registration. The tutoring itself will begin the first week of October.

Harvard-Kent educates the largest number of students living in public housing in the state. The students thrive on healthy adult relationships; not only can tutoring help the children with their lessons, it can provide a positive role model for them as well.

If you are interested in helping out as a tutor, please call Tom MacDonald in the Social Ministry Office at 617-337-3545 or send an email to tmacdonald@stmarystcatherine.org.

Young Adult Group rescheduled!

Event rescheduled! The Young Adult group will host a conversation with Father Ronan after the 6:00 p.m. Mass on August 17! We will discuss prayer in our daily lives. Pizza and drinks will be served. Please join us for this exciting discussion! If you would like to learn more, please send an email to akrane@stmarystcatherine.org.

CatholicTV covering Celestine Year

CatholicTV will offer content during the Jubilee Year of Pope Saint Celestine V, a pontiff who served only five months and eight days, yet is well known for his decree to resign as pope.

Continue reading CatholicTV covering Celestine Year

Feast of the Assumption of Mary next Friday

Friday, August 15 is the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary into Heaven. The Church holds that, at the end of her earthly life, Our Lady’s body was assumed into Heaven before it could begin to decay. Universal celebration of the Feast can be traced back to about the 6th Century. It is considered the most important of all Marian feasts because it commemorates Mary’s entrance into eternal life. On Nov. 1, 1950, Pope Pius XII declared “that the Immaculate Mother of God, the ever Virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory.” Exercising papal infallibility, Pope Pius XII declared this belief as a dogma of the Catholic Church.

Catholics are obliged to attend Mass on this day or on the vigil of this Feast. We will celebrate Mass in St. Catherine of Siena Chapel on Friday, Aug. 15 at 8AM and 7PM. We hope you can join us for this special feast honoring Mary, the Mother of God.

All that remains

It was, by all accounts, a day like any other day. There was some tension among the people who had heard about the bombing in Hiroshima on August 6. Some were making plans to go to the countryside as a precautionary measure. And then it hit. It was August 9, 1945. A second infamous atomic bomb had been released. This time it was on the city of Nagasaki.

Continue reading All that remains