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From the Pastor


Watch Catholic TV

BBC explores Castel Gandolfo

The beautiful gardens of this historic papal retreat are now open to the public, and BBC Travel has received an opportunity to film them. Watch the video here.

Are you interested in vocations?

Pope Saint John XXIII National Seminary

Are you between 30 and 60, and have you ever considered a vocation to the priesthood? Pope Saint John XXIII National Seminary in Weston has prepared second-career seminarians for 50 years. Almost 600 alumni now serve around the world. Learn in an environment attuned to the adult learner with men sharing similar backgrounds and life experiences. Please visit blessedjohnxxiii.edu or call (781) 899-5500.

Fiat! for discerning women

Fiat! is a discernment group for women in the Boston area considering a vocation to religious life in the Catholic Church. They are a cooperative project of women religious of the Archdiocese of Boston. Fiat meetings take place on the last Wednesday of every month. Follow them on Facebook to learn about upcoming trips and dinners! To learn more, please contact Sr. Marian Batho, CSJ at 617-746-5637 or Sr_Marian_Batho@rcab.org.

Rosary service and Prayer for Peace

The infant Jesus giving Rosary beads to St. Dominic and Mary giving Rosary beads to St. Catherine of Siena.

Next monthly Prayer for Peace on Aug. 2

At the Parish Center, 46 Winthrop Street—We invite parishioners and guests to gather to pray for peace on the first Saturday of every month at 9AM. During our time together we will have a Rosary Service. (Familiarity with praying the Rosary is not necessary)

The Holy Rosary is a contemplative and Christ-centered prayer that highlights various moments in His life. These moments are clustered into four “Mysteries” focused on various periods in the life of Jesus: the Joyful Mysteries (the early life of Jesus); The Sorrowful Mysteries (the arrest, passion, and death of Jesus); the Glorious Mysteries (the resurrection, ascension, descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles, The Assumption of Mary into Heaven and the Coronation of Mary as Queen of Heaven and Earth); and the Luminous Mysteries (the Baptism of Jesus, His first miracle at the Wedding Feast of Cana, His preaching, the Transfiguration and the Institution of the Eucharist).

When our Lady appeared to the three children in Fatima, Portugal, she enjoined the world to pray the Rosary each day for peace. We hope you will join us!

For more information, please call (617) 242-4664 or send an email to ncitro@stmarystcatherine.org.

Pope Francis, Cardinal O’Malley on border crisis

In response to the great numbers of children now entering the United States, Pope Francis has released the following statement:

“This is a category of migrants from Central America and Mexico itself who cross the border with the United States under extreme conditions and in pursuit of a hope that in most cases turns out to be vain. They are increasing day by day. This humanitarian emergency requires, as a first urgent measure, these children be welcomed and protected. These measures, however, will not be sufficient, unless they are accompanied by policies that inform people about the dangers of such a journey and, above all, that promote development in their countries of origin.”

Recently, Boston Cardinal Sean O’Malley made additional comments:

“The Catholic Church at every level, globally, nationally and locally has long experience in assisting immigrants and refugees often fleeing from danger suffering and deprivation …  It is crucial for all of us I believe to begin any discussion with our eyes on these children. The Archdiocesan agencies are already stretched by demands here at home, but we still wish to offer our help in facing this humanitarian emergency. I ask my own faith community and the wider public to understand compassionately the extreme circumstances these children are facing. As a country and a Church we are capable of providing crucial assistance.”

Action alert to Congress

Protect vulnerable, unaccompanied children

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops is asking Catholics to urge their senators and representatives to oppose legislative efforts to strip protection away from unaccompanied children who are fleeing from violence in Central America and seeking refuge in the United States. Urge them to pass a supplemental that provides for the care and protection of vulnerable children, ensures that their due process rights are preserved, and addresses the root causes of their flight, particularly violence in their home countries.

Continue reading Action alert to Congress

Where do you stand?

It is an ancient story Jews and Christians have repeated through the ages. It goes to the heart of the Judeo-Christian understanding of the mercy of God as our protector, savior, and our hope, and it began centuries ago in Egypt with the birth of a little boy. The boy was born into a Jewish family at a time when the Pharaoh was oppressing the Jewish slaves. He decided to kill all newborn boys. The mother, rather than face the death of her baby, placed the innocent child in a basket among the reeds of a river bank. The child was rescued and adopted by the daughter of the Pharaoh and named Moses.

Continue reading Where do you stand?

Window from St. Catherine’s installed in Parish Center

A stained glass window from St. Catherine of Siena Church has found a new home in our renovated Eucharistic Chapel at the Parish Center on 46 Winthrop Street.

The richly colored glass depicting Mary was formerly located in a stairway by the sacristy in St. Catherine of Siena Church. It is a fine addition to our Eucharistic Chapel and conference room.

Every Friday at 3:30 p.m., the Eucharistic Chapel holds the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, which is followed by Holy Hour of Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. You are welcome to join us! If you cannot make adoration, feel free to stop by the Parish Center during business hours, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

St. Joseph School

St. Joseph School in Medford, Mass. is a contemporary, Catholic, private academic education grounded in a commitment to character and spiritual development.

  • Contemporary Academic Program based on new National Common Core Standards and traditional value
  • Preschool, kindergarten and transitional kindergarten for children not meeting the September age requirement
  • Accelerated Reading Program for all Primary level Students
  • Bus Transportation for Medford Residents
  • Charter Member, Nat’l Junior Honor Society
  • Pre-K-Grade 8
  • Strong middle school ethic, curriculum
  • Enrichment program
  • Updated facility includes tech and science labs, full gymnasium, and cafeteria
  • Class enrollment designed to provide individualized attention and flexible grouping

Comprehensive Special Education Services  Available

Tuition payment plans available

After school programs

All are welcome!

To learn more about St. Joseph’s programs and to receive an overview, call 781-396-3636

Fall Courses at Theological Institute of Saint John’s Seminary

Tuesday, September 2

Fall semester classes begin at The Theological Institute, Saint John’s Seminary located at 149 Washington Street in Brighton. Get involved in learning more about the Catholic faith and see where it leads!

Registration is now available online at: www.sjs.edu.  617.779.4104. Courses may be taken for either credit or audit.  Applications are currently being accepted for Fall 2014 admissions.

Visit the website to review all the Fall 2014 course offerings.  Come and see what is happening at the expanding Theological Institute!

Tuesday, October 14

The Theological Institute at Saint John’s Seminary will host a Fall Open House for the Degree Programs: (Master of Arts in Ministry Program & Master of Theological Studies for the New Evangelization) at 7:00 p.m. at 149 Washington Street, Brighton, MA.  Come learn more about our degree programs!  Watch for more information at www.sjs.edu or call: 617.779.4104.

Did you know?

Did you know why our church does not have a steeple?

For centuries, steeples have been an easily recognized marker for a church. In very early churches, steeples were built as high as possible not only to point to heaven and raise the cross, but also to protect worshipers from the evil spirits many early Christians believed plagued church buildings. Steep roofs, sharp steeples, and gargoyles were added to church designs hoping to drive away evil creatures.

During the Middle Ages, steeples also became functional as the housing for church bells used to call the hour, and remind people of the times for prayer. By the 15th century, most churches had steeples with bells.

The original design for St. Mary’s Church called for a steeple on the corner of Winthrop and Warren streets, but due to the danger of the already heavy foundation sinking from the additional weight of a steeple, it was never built. We now have bells, but without the usual steeple surrounding it.